MEET YOUR PERFECT MOTHER

  • Female Images of God in the Bible

    Genesis 1:27 Women and Men created in God’s image

    “Humankind was created as God’s reflection: in the divine image God created them; female and male, God made them.”

    Hosea 11:3-4 God described as a mother

    God: “Yet it was I who taught Ephraim to walk, I who took them up in my arms; but they did not know that I healed them. I led them with cords of human kindness, with bands of love. I was to them like those who lift infants to their cheeks. I bent down to them and fed them.”

    Hosea 13:8 God described as a mother bear

    “Like a bear robbed of her cubs, I will attack them and tear them asunder…”

    Deuteronomy 32:11-12 God described as a mother eagle

    “Like the eagle that stirs up its nest, and hovers over its young, God spreads wings to catch you, and carries you on pinions.”

    Deuteronomy 32:18 God who gives birth

    “You were unmindful of the Rock that bore you; you forgot the God who gave you birth.”

    Isaiah 66:13 God as a comforting mother

    God: “As a mother comforts her child, so I will comfort you; you shall be comforted in Jerusalem.”

    Isaiah 49:15 God compared to a nursing mother

    God: “Can a woman forget her nursing child, or show no compassion for the child of her womb? Even these may forget, yet I will not forget you.”

    Isaiah 42:14 God as a woman in labor

    God: “For a long time I have held my peace, I have kept myself still and restrained myself; now I will cry out like a woman in labor, I will gasp and pant.”

    Psalm 131:2 God as a Mother

    “But I have calmed and quieted my soul, like a weaned child with its mother; my soul is like the weaned child that is with me.”

    Psalm 123:2-3 God compared to a woman

    “As the eyes of a servant looks to the hand of their master, as the eyes of a maid to the hand of her mistress, so our eyes look to you, YHWH, until you show us your mercy!”

    Matthew 23:37 and Luke 13:34 God as a Mother Hen

    Jesus: “Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often have I desired to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing!”

    Luke 15:8-10 God as woman looking for her lost coin

    Jesus: “Or what woman having ten silver coins, is she loses one of them, does not light a lamp, sweep the house, and search carefully until she finds it? When she has found it, she calls together her friends and neighbors saying, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found the coin that I had lost.’ Just so, I tell you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents.”

    God as Mother Bird & Mother Bear

    One of the common images is God as a mother bird sheltering her children under her wings. We see this in Ruth 2:12 – “May you be richly rewarded by the LORD, the God of Israel, under whose wings you have come to take refuge.” (All references are from Today’s New International Version.) The Psalms used this imagery a number of times:

    “Keep me as the apple of your eye; hide me in the shadow of your wings.” (Psa. 17:8)

    “… I will take refuge in the shadow of your wings until the disaster has passed.” (Psa. 57:1)

    “He will cover you with his feathers, and under his wings you will find refuge …” (Psa. 91:4)

    These images paint God as a protecting and sheltering God for his people. But a variation of this image paints a God who also pushes his children to be independent and to grow stronger. Mother eagles are known to teach their young ones to fly by deliberately pushing them out of its nest but catching them before they plunge to their doom: “[God] guarded [Jacob] as the apple of his eye, like an eagle that stirs up its nest and hovers over its young, that spreads its wings to catch them and carries them aloft.” (Deuteronomy God as Mother

    Of all the prophets, Isaiah seems to be the fondest in painting God as an actual human mother as these three verses attest:

    “For a long time I [God] have kept silent, I have been quiet and held myself back. But now, like a woman in childbirth, I cry out, I gasp and pant.” (Isa. 42:14)

    “As a mother comforts her child, so will I [God] comfort you; and you will be comforted over Jerusalem.” (Isa. 66:13)

    “Can a mother forget the baby at her breast and have no compassion on the child she has borne? Though she may forget, I [God] will not forget you!” (Isa. 49:15)

     32:10-11)

     

    The Bible sometimes combines male and female imagery in one verse or passage:

    If my father and mother forsake me, the LORD will take me up. (Psa 27:10)

    28 ‘Has the rain a father, or who has begotten the drops of dew?
    29 From whose womb did the ice come forth,
    and who has given birth to the hoarfrost of heaven? (Job 38:28-29)

    Hosea 11 begins:

    1 When Israel was a child, I loved him,
    and out of Egypt I called my son.

    2 The more I called them, the more they went from me;
    they kept sacrificing to the Baals, and offering incense to idols.

    3 Yet it was I who taught Ephraim to walk,
    I took them up in my arms;
    but they did not know that I healed them.

    4 I led them with cords of human kindness, with bands of love.
    I was to them like those who lift infants to their cheeks.
    I bent down to them and fed them.

    Do you thus repay the LORD, O foolish and senseless people? Is not he your father, who created you, who made you and established you? (Deu 32:6)

    But soon adds mother to the thought:

    You were unmindful of the Rock that bore you;
    you forgot the God who gave you birth. (Deu 32:18)

    Motherly pictures are used several times, in very different ways, in Isaiah 40ff. In the traumatic situation of exile, after the brutal destruction of Jerusalem, faced with the complaint:

    ‘The LORD has forsaken me, my Lord has forgotten me.’ (Is 49:14)

    As a picture of God’s constant unchanging love the prophet replied:

    Can a woman forget her nursing child,
    or show no compassion for the child of her womb?
    Even these may forget,
    yet I will not forget you. (Is 49:15)

     

    This use of motherly imagery may seem conventional, but what about the gasping panting woman in labour in Isaiah 42? There it describes God as a soldier bent on destruction:

    13 The LORD goes forth like a soldier,
    like a warrior he stirs up his fury;
    he cries out, he shouts aloud,
    he shows himself mighty against his foes.

    14 For a long time I have held my peace,
    I have kept still and restrained myself;
    now I will cry out like a woman in labour,
    I will gasp and pant.

    15 I will lay waste mountains and hills,
    and dry up all their herbage;
    I will turn the rivers into islands,
    and dry up the pools. (Isa 42:13-15)

    First nine chapters of Proverbs focus on Wisdom

    Proverbs 3:18

    (NLT)

    18 Wisdom is a tree of life to those who embrace her;

        happy are those who hold her tightly.

    ·         Proverbs 4:13 she is your life, giver of life

    ·         Proverbs 8:35 whoever finds me finds life

    ·         Proverbs 8:15 decrees what is right

    ·         Proverbs 8: 22 – 31 like Wisdom herself, before the foundation of the earth I was there. Wisdom comes from God, was created by God

    ·         Wisdom 7:22 – 8:1 She is the fashioner of all things; 21 attributes which is the product of two perfect numbers 3 & 7. Wisdom is perfection multiplied by perfection. Intelligent, holy, unique, manifold, subtle, mobile, clear, unpolluted, distinct, invulnerable, loving good, keen, irresistible, beneficent, humane, steadfast, sure, free from anxiety, all powerful. Overseeing all, penetrating through all other intelligent spirits

    ·          

    ·         Wisdom 8:1 She orders all things

    ·         Wisdom 7: 24 She pervades and penetrates all things

    ·         Wisdom 7:27 She renews all things – renewable energy

    ·         Wisdom 9:10 She shares the throne of God

    ·         Wisdom 7:10 – 14 She’s the source of all things new

    ·         Sirach 1:1 – 8 It is God who knows wisdom and pours her forth upon the world

    ·         Sirach 24: 1 – 27 Hymn of self-praise sung by Wisdom in which she describes herself, her origins, her relationship to God and the good things she does for human beings. She came from the mouth of God, she is God’s word, breath, Spirit; as the spirit/wind that hovered over the waters of creation and as mist / steam that covered the earth at the beginning; she is universal, everywhere. Her image as a tree echoes Proverbs 8 – she strikes root among God’s people. She feeds all who long for her. Her food is sweeter than honey. Her food is herself. All who eat of her will hunger still, who drink of her will thirst for more. One will never be able to get enough of what she offers. What she offers is life. She concludes her song with a promise similar to Proverbs 8:35 – 34 – those who obey her will not be shamed. Those who serve her will not fall short. I believe she is the personification of God’s wisdom as the feminine archetype.

     

    The uninspired Jewish writings spoke of the descent and re-ascent of Wisdom (1 Enoch 42; 4 Ezra 5:9; 2 Bar. 48:36; 3 Enoch 5:12; 6:3), and Philo especially connects Wisdom and the Logos.

     

     

    Birthing God – womb
    • Gen 7:1 – Breasts illuminate a feminine image of God
    • Deut. 32:18 “You forget the rock who begot you, unmindful of the God who gave birth to you”

    • Job 38:8 “Who shut in the sea with doors when it burst out from the womb?”
    • Job 38: 28-29 God’s fathering of rain and giving birth to ice from her womb
    • Isaiah 42:14 “I groan like a woman in labor; I will gasp and pant”
    • Isaiah 46: 3-4: “You who have been carried since birth, whom I have carried since time you were born” – incubating in God’s womb
    • John 1:12: Those who believe in God are born of God
    • John 4:7: Everyone who loves is born of God
    • John 16:21: God is bringing forth a new humanity like the pangs of a woman in labor; her hour has come
    • Acts 17: In God we live and move and have our being
    • Gal 4:19: God’s womb is in pain
    • Romans 8:22 From the beginning to now the entire creation has been groaning in one great act of giving birth (creation)

    Creator God of Israel is also imaged as the shaper, maker and mother God who formed Israel in the womb and birthed Israel with labor pains:
    • (Deut. 32:18; Psalm 90:2; Proverbs 8:24 – 25; Isaiah 43:1,7,15; 44:2, 24; 45:9, 11; 51:13; 54:5 From the word “womb” (rehem) comes the verb “to have compassion” (raham), and the phrase “Yahweh’s compassionate (rahum) and gracious” repeatedly appears in the Hebrew scripture to describe the merciful and saving acts of God in history. (Deut. 4:31; 2 Chronicles 30:9;  Nehemiah 9:17; Ps 78:38; 86:16; 103:8; 111:4; 112:4; 145:8; John 4:7 These verses show images of God who demonstrates “womb – like compassion” for her child Israel.
    • God creator is sometimes depicted as woman giving birth and sometimes a reproductive image of God as both male and female: Deut 32:18; Job 38:28 – 29; Is 42:14; Acts 17; John 16:21; Gal 4:19; Rom 8:22; John 1:12

    Nursing mother:
    • Isaiah 49:15 does a woman forget her baby at the breast, or fail to cherish the son (daughter) of her womb
    • Numbers 11:12 was it I who conceived all this people, was it I who gave them birth that you should say to me, carry them in your bosom like a nurse with a baby at the breast
    • Psalm 131:2 – 3 But I have calmed and quieted my soul, like a weaned child with its mother; my soul within me is like a weaned child.
    • John 7: 38 From his breast shall flow the fountains of living water
    • 1 Peter 2:2 – 3 You are newborn and like babies you should be hungry for nothing but milk – now that you have tasted the goodness of Christ

    Nurturing God – mother:
    • Gen 1 :2 nesting mother
    • Deut 32 : 11 – 12 mother eagle
    • Hosea 11:34 I myself taught Ephram to walk, I took them in my arms
    • Hosea 13: 8 I will fall upon them like a bear robbed of her cubs
    • Psalm 131 image of repose – like a child in its mother’s arms as content as a child that has been weaned
    • Ps 17:8 guard me in the shadow of your wings
    • Ps 36:7 all people may take refuge in the shadow of your wings
    • Ps 57:1 in the shadow of your wings I will take refuge
    • Ps 61:4 find refuge under the shelter of your wings
    • Isaiah 31:5 like birds hovering overhead, so the Lord of hosts will protect Jerusalem
    • Isaiah 46:3 – 4 who have been borne by me from your birth carried from the womb… even when you turn gray, I will carry you. I have made and I will bear, I will carry and will save
    • Isaiah 66: 10 –13 comforting mother…… as a mother comforts her child, so will I comfort you
    • Luke 15:8 woman tirelessly sweeping for her lost coin, for what is important to her
    • Luke 13: 34 (Matt 23:37), how often I desired to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings

    Other images:
    • Ruah – Gen 2:7, Ps 104: 29; Jn 3:8 presence gives life; feminine Hebrew word meaning breath, wind, inspiration or spirit.
    • Rahamin Hebrew word for compassion – root word, rahan, means womb.
    • El Shaddai – God of the mountains or God of the breasts
    • Seamstress – Gen 3:21
    • Washerwoman Isaiah 4:4, Psalm 51:7
    • Midwife Psalm 22:9 – 11, Psalm 71:6; Isaiah 66:9
    • Woman baking bread Matt 13:33
    • Seeks justice Proverbs 8:18

    The Bible offers a picture of God who mothers through the work of birthing, preserving, and nurturing God’s children. But such imagery is not without some tension.

    God’s mothering work begins in childbirth, as most mothering work does. The sea leaps out of God’s womb (Job 38:8), and the ice is brought forth from God’s womb (Job 38:28-29). Creation thus is not just a spoken event, but a birthing event that comes from the whole being of God.

    In other places, the language of birth and the female body is less clear, but ancient readers would have understood it as birthing language. Genesis 14: 19 and 22 speak of God as the “maker” of the heavens and the earth. The word, “maker” is the same Hebrew word that Eve uses when she gives birth, or “produces” her son Cain in Genesis 4:1. God also births Wisdom, as described in Proverbs 8:22-25.

    Birthing language continues as a description of how creation experiences sin and its future. In Paul’s famous imagery of female groaning in active labor, the creation groans as it labors towards redemption and new life in Romans 8:22. Such mothering language also underscores the nurturing vitality of God’s creation.

    Jesus Christ speaks of himself in terms of birthing a new humanity. Before his arrest and crucifixion, according to John 17:1, Jesus states that “the hour has come” -– a phrase that was used frequently to refer to the moment when active labor starts for a woman in childbirth. Christ’s use of mothering imagery in the throes of death point to the new humanity that he brings forth for the sake of the world.

    Once mothers bring children into the world, they work to preserve and save their children from harm and death. Israel’s cry to God, possibly recorded while in its Babylonian exile, offers imagery of how God as a mother preserves God’s child, Israel (Deuteronomy 32:18, see this explanatory note on the Song of Moses). In Isaiah 49:13-15, God responds to the people’s cry by reassuring them with the question, “Can a woman forget her nursing child, or show no compassion for the child of her womb?”

    Preserving children also entails feeding them. God the mother feeds God’s children in Isaiah 49:15. But in Numbers 11:12-13, God may have forgotten God’s children were hungry! Moses complains that God gave birth to Israel, but God has now left it up to Moses to feed them.

    Another aspect of “motherwork” in the Bible is the training and nurturing of disciples, as children are trained and nurtured by their mothers. The Gospel of John suggests that those “born of God” (John 1:12) and those “born in the Spirit” (John 3:6) are to imitate the caring acts of God. The apostle Paul imagines his own discipleship as the imitation of God’s mothering work. In Galatians 4:19, Paul writes that he must “go through the pain of giving birth” to the Galatians “all over again until Christ is formed” in them. To the Thessalonians (1 Thessalonians 2: 7-8) he says that his devotion to them is “like a mother feeding and lookin2g after her own children.”

    The maternal language for discipleship in the New Testament was so compelling that medieval monastic leaders such as Bernard of Clairvaux urged his fellow monks to be “mothers” to those in their care.

    Perhaps one of the most touching mothering images of God in the Bible comes in Hosea 11:4, where God is depicted as saying (about Ephraim): “I was to them like those who lift infants to their cheeks. I bent down to them and fed them.” This brief passage depicts the essence of mothering, namely, a woman’s relationship to the child she loves. Such imagery describes a God who has the capacity and the desire to bend down, to lift up and hold, to stroke, to cover, hug, feed, bathe, and to hold us.

    Despite the Bible’s mother imagery for God, it must be acknowledged that among women who are mothers, there is ambivalence about images of divine mothering. Human mothers tell stories of exhaustion, irritation, anger, and helplessness –- feelings that are less than divine.

    If maternal imagery for God deepens the pressure that is put on mothers today to be perfect or to be ideals of motherhood, or if it suggests to mothers that their struggles are signs of failure, then such biblical imagery will only oppress and alienate human mothers.

    The maternal imagery for God in the Bible must be seen as a way to describe God’s care for humanity within the domestic, micro-narratives of our lives -- including care for mothers themselves! In this sense, the motherwork of God is work that can be done by men or women. It is a work of care that preserves and protects all humanity, especially mothers and their children.

    There are profound metaphors of God as feminine in the Hebrew Old Testament. On occasion this poetic imagery is allegorized literally as female; most often the feminine appears in the Hebrew Bible in metaphor and allegory, as in Deuteronomy 32:18b where God, here named Eloah,gives birth to Israel in groaning and travail as of a woman giving birth.1 In later Jewish writings in the midrashim, or stories, the Shekhinah, or Divine Presence, is depicted literally in female form.2

    In the Hebrew Old Testament itself, the feminine imagery is most often allegorical and poetic. Yet the feminine is there in the language incorporating the feminine principle into the very essence of God.3

    The foundation for thinking of God in feminine terms is in the prologue to Genesis, Genesis 1:1 to 2:4. Scholars call this poetic section the Elohistic account of Creation because of the divine name used predominantly throughout and consider it to be newer than the earlier JEHOVAH (another divine name) account of the creation of Adam and Eve in chapter 2. Many feel that in so much of the Bible, the inspired priestly poets, scribes, and prophets rearranged topics and verses.4

    The Hebrew writers were also obviously familiar with the mythology of the surrounding Canaanite culture, much as we are thoroughly familiar with the worldly, secular culture that surrounds us. However, the Lord inspired these writers of Scripture to reinterpret what they found.5

    For women, this introduction to Genesis has profound implications, which are being grasped as a growing number of scholars closely examine the original Hebrew text. Simply stated, God is described in both masculine and feminine in the opening verses of Genesis. God (a masculine noun) creates by his Word, and life begins as the spirit (a feminine noun) of God hovers over the earth with her life-giving breath.6

    The Hebrew word for God in Genesis 1 is Elohim. So, in the beginning, Elohim created the heavens and the earth. For women, the significance is that the ruach Elohim of Genesis 1:2 is a feminine noun accompanied with a feminine-ending verb form, m’rechephet. Thus, the “spirit of God hovering” is a metaphorical allusion to the feminine in God. The verb m’rechephet is identical to the verb used in Deuteronomy 32:11 where God is compared to a mother eagle: God upholds Israel as an eagle hovers and spreads her wings. (It is not customary to use the pronoun She to identify the spirit, but in the Hebrew the Spirit cannot be identified with the pronoun He,according to many Hebrew scholars.)7

    Deuteronomy 32 was the Song of Moses, which many scholars consider to be a part of the earliest and most sacred of the Hebrew traditions.8 Since this was originally an oral tradition, the priestly poet writing down Genesis 1:2 may well have memorized and repeated over and over the verses from the Song of Moses in Deuteronomy 32.

    I believe that Genesis 1:2 was a deliberate allusion to the ancient poetical Song. I view this allusion to the feminine in Genesis 1:2 as a brilliant synthesis. It also helps develop the argument that the feminine imagery is integral to the original Hebrew concept of God.9

    This allusion to the feminine in God builds in Genesis 1:26-27 where mankind, ha-adam, is made in the image and likeness of God, and ha-adam, male and female, is given dominion over all earth. This verse has often been interpreted to mean that man/male is the image and likeness of God; in recent years, however, many scholars are interpreting Genesis 1:26-27 as humankind, male and female, as the image and likeness of God.10

    These two passages in Genesis 1-2:4 are foundational to any concept of the feminine in God in the Hebrew Scripture. These include the parallel description of Genesis 1:1 of the masculine God Elohim creating the heavens and the earth, followed by the description in Genesis 1-2 of the ruach Elohim, or Spirit of God, in feminine noun and verb form with its allusion to God as a mother eagle in Deuteronomy 32:11. Second, it includes the description in Genesis 1:26-27 of ha-adam, mankind, male and female, as the image and likeness of God.11

    This word image of Elohim also incorporated the feminine as a noun concept, the ruach Elohim. This God was a plurality of oneness, the one including the many, the masculine and feminine combined, the two in one.17

    The Shema found in Deuteronomy 6:4: Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God is one (echad) LORD. Echad means a "compound unity." It literally means the two become one – similar to a marriage when husband and wife become as one united with each other in thought and deed. Similar to the two becoming one flesh. In the case of Elohim the two become one in Spirit.

    This is a brilliant use of language. If we truly believe this is the Word of God, then the Word is inspired by a God who loves word play and delights in symbolism and a sophisticated use of language. This is poetry.18 This is metaphor. This is imagery. It is not theology as I think of theology. It is poetic imagery of God. It allows for the unity of the married couple in our Christian sacramental teachings in which man and wife become two in one flesh. Further, it can be expanded into our ecumenical concepts of the ways in which people follow Christ. We are one in the Spirit. We are one in the Lord. It allows for our Christian concept of the mystical body of Christ: We are one breed. We are one body. God in the Hebrew vision was a plurality of oneness.19

    This God of the Hebrews was also demythologized. Sexuality was taken out of the literal performance of the fertility rites that were performed in pagan temple rituals to insure the productivity of the land; it was spiritualized and taken into the realm of transcendence and spirit. Sexuality of male and female was treated as allegory and symbol within the essence of God. Creation was by God’s Word when God said, Let there be light. Life began with the living breath of the Spirit of God, the ruach Elohim our Heavenly Mother.

    Although the feminine in God was transformed and lifted into the realm of spirit, it was not eliminated. Rather, it became described in allegory and metaphor. The Hebrews emphasized the ruach Elohim, identified with the mother eagle of Deuteronomy 32:11. Then even later in the Wisdom literature, including Proverbs and the apocryphal books of Wisdom and Sirach, this holy spirit of God was identified with Lady Wisdom (Prov. 1:20-22; 8:1-9:6; Wis. 1:6-7, 6:22-25).20

    In summary, in the first two verses of Genesis there is a parallel construction between the masculine and feminine. In the first verse, God, Elohim, creates the heavens and the earth. The noun is masculine and the verb ending is feminine. In the second verse, the ruach Elohim m’reche-phet, the spirit of God hovers. The noun, spirit or breath or wind, is feminine, and the verb ending is feminine. This ruach Elohim (Gen. 1:2) is identified with the mother eagle of Deuteronomy 32:11. Male and female are in the image and likeness of God (Gen. 1:26-27). Wisdom is identified as She in the Protestant Book of Proverbs (8:24). The Holy Spirit is identified with the feminine spirit of Wisdom in the Apocrypha.

    I am now aware that there are many passages concerning God in the Hebrew describing God in maternal and feminine metaphor, including Deuteronomy 32:18b, where God groans and gives birth in an image of a woman in labor. My foundational concept of the feminine in God is in Genesis in the introduction, where God is described with both masculine and feminine nouns and verbs, as Elohim and ruach Elohim. I now have this awesome certitude that, as a woman, I have been defined in the Hebrew Scripture as made in the image and likeness of God.21

     

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  • MEET YOUR PERFECT MOTHER, THE HOLY SPIRIT

    MEET YOUR PERFECT MOTHER, THE HOLY SPIRIT

    Published: Feb 11, 2019

    A disciple [asked] the Lord for something worldly. Yeshua says to him, “Request of thy Mother and she will give to thee from what belongs to another.”

     

    Philip 38

    Yeshua says…For my mother bore my body, yet my True Mother gave me the life.

     

    Thomas 101

    In the days when we were Hebrews, we were left fatherless, having only our Mother (the Sacred Spirit). Yet when we became Christics (Messianics), Father came to be with Mother for us.

     

    Philip 6

    Honor your father and your mother, so that you may live long in the land the Lord your God is giving you.

    Exodus 20:12

    She alone is the truth. She makes the multitude, and concerning us she teaches this alone in a love through many.

    Philip 12

    In fact, God’s character and actions are revealed by feminine imagery in at least 26 places:

    Numbers 11:12- 11 He asked the Lord, “Why have you brought this trouble on your servant? What have I done to displease you that you put the burden of all these people on me? 12 Did I conceive all these people? Did I give them birth? Why do you tell me to carry them in my arms, as a nurse carries an infant, to the land you promised on oath to their ancestors?

    Deuteronomy 32:18 - 18 You deserted the Rock, who fathered you;  you forgot the God who gave you birth.

    Ruth 2:12 - 12 May the Lord repay you for what you have done. May you be richly rewarded by the Lord, the God of Israel, under whose wings you have come to take refuge.”

     

    Job 38:8 - 8 “Who shut up the sea behind doors when it burst forth from the womb,

     

    Job 38:28–29 - 28 Does the rain have a father ? Who fathers the drops of dew?29 From whose womb comes the ice? Who gives birth to the frost from the heavens

     

    Psalm 17:8 - 8 Keep me as the apple of your eye;  hide me in the shadow of your wings

     

    Psalm 22:9–10 - 9 Yet you brought me out of the womb;  you made me trust in you, even at my mother’s breast. 10 From birth I was cast on you; from my mother’s womb you have been my God.

     

    Psalm 90:2 - 2 Before the mountains were born  or you brought forth the whole world, from everlasting to everlasting you are God.

     

    Psalm 91:4 - 4 He will cover you with his feathers   and under his wings you will find refuge;  his faithfulness will be your shield and rampart.

     

    Psalm 123:2 - As the eyes of slaves look to the hand of their master,  as the eyes of a female slave look to the hand of her mistress,so our eyes look to the Lord our God, till he shows us his mercy.

     

    Psalm 131:2–3 - 2 But I have calmed and quieted myself,I am like a weaned child with its mother; like a weaned child I am content.3 Israel, put your hope in the Lord both now and forevermore.

     

    Proverbs 8:1 - Does not wisdom call out?  Does not understanding raise her voice?

     

    Proverbs 8:22–25 - 22 “The Lord brought me forth as the first of his works,[a][b]before his deeds of old;

     

    23 I was brought forth long ages ago, at the very beginning, when the world came to be.24 When there were no watery depths, I was brought forth  when there were no springs overflowing with water;25 before the mountains were settled in place  before the hills, I was brought forth,

     

    Isaiah 31:5 - 5 Like birds hovering overhead,the Lord Almighty will shield Jerusalem;

     

    he will shield it and deliver it,he will ‘pass over’ it and will rescue it.”

     

    Isaiah 42:13–14 - 13 The Lord will march out like a champion, like a warrior he will stir up his zeal; with a shout he will raise the battle cry and will triumph over his enemies.14 “For a long time I have kept silent, I have been quiet and held myself back.But now, like a woman in childbirth,I cry out, I gasp and pant.

     

    Isaiah 45:10 - Woe to the one who says to a father  ‘What have you begotten?’or to a mother,

     

        ‘What have you brought to birth?’

     

    Isaiah 46:3 - 3 “Listen to me, you descendants of Jacob,all the remnant of the people of Israel,you whom I have upheld since your birth, and have carried since you were born.

     

    Isaiah 49:15 - 15 “Can a mother forget the baby at her breast and have no compassion on the child she has borne? Though she may forget,  I will not forget you!

     

    Isaiah 63:15 - 15 Look down from heaven and see,  from your lofty throne, holy and glorious.Where are your zeal and your might?Your tenderness and compassion are withheld from us.

     

    Isaiah 66:7–13 - 7 “Before she goes into labor,she gives birth; before the pains come upon her, she delivers a son.8 Who has ever heard of such things? Who has ever seen things like this? Can a country be born in a day or a nation be brought forth in a moment? Yet no sooner is Zion in labor than she gives birth to her children.9 Do I bring to the moment of birth and not give delivery?” says the Lord.“Do I close up the womb when I bring to delivery?” says your God. 10 “Rejoice with Jerusalem and be glad for her, all you who love her; rejoice greatly with her, all you who mourn over her. 11 For you will nurse and be satisfied at her comforting breasts; you will drink deeply  and delight in her overflowing abundance.” 12 For this is what the Lord says: “I will extend peace to her like a river, and the wealth of nations like a flooding stream; you will nurse and be carried on her arm and dandled on her knees. 13 As a mother comforts her child, so will I comfort you; and you will be comforted over Jerusalem.”

     

    Hosea 13:8 - 8 Like a bear robbed of her cubs  I will attack them and rip them open; like a lion I will devour them—  a wild animal will tear them apart.

     

    Matthew 23:37 - 37 “Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, and you were not willing.

     

    Luke 13:34 - 34 “Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, and you were not willing.

     

    Luke 15:8–10 - 8 “Or suppose a woman has ten silver coins[a] and loses one. Doesn’t she light a lamp, sweep the house and search carefully until she finds it? 9 And when she finds it, she calls her friends and neighbors together and says, ‘Rejoice with me; I have found my lost coin.’ 10 In the same way, I tell you, there is rejoicing in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents.”

     

    John 3:3–8 - 3 Jesus replied, “Very truly I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born again.[a]”4 “How can someone be born when they are old?” Nicodemus asked. “Surely they cannot enter a second time into their mother’s womb to be born!”5 Jesus answered, “Very truly I tell you, no one can enter the kingdom of God unless they are born of water and the Spirit. 6 Flesh gives birth to flesh, but the Spirit[b] gives birth to spirit. 7 You should not be surprised at my saying, ‘You[c] must be born again.’ 8 The wind blows wherever it pleases. You hear its sound, but you cannot tell where it comes from or where it is going. So it is with everyone born of the Spirit.”[d]

     

    1 Peter 2:2–3 - 2 Like newborn babies, crave pure spiritual milk, so that by it you may grow up in your salvation, 3 now that you have tasted that the Lord is good.

     

     

     

    The nature of the spiritual birth by the Holy Spirit points directly to a feminine Holy Spirit

     

    Quoting from John 3:

     

    There was a man of the Pharisees, named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews; the same came to Jesus by night, and said unto him, Rabbi, we know that thou art a teacher come from God; for no man can do these miracles that thou doest, except God be with him. Jesus answered, and said unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God. Nicodemus saith unto him, How can a man be born when he is old? Can he enter the second time into his mother’s womb, and be born? Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God. That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit. Marvel not that I said unto you, Ye must be born again. The wind bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound of it, but canst not tell from where it cometh, and where it goeth; so is every one that is born of the Spirit. Nicodemus answered, and said unto him, How can these things be? Jesus answered, and said unto him, Art thou a teacher of Israel, and knowest not these things? Verily, verily, I say unto thee, We speak that which we do know, and testify to that which we have seen; and ye receive not our witness.

     

    Acts Chapter 2 makes a singular association between this rebirth described in John 3 and the Holy Spirit, identifying the Holy Spirit as the Birther. Because gender weakness is frowned upon in the passages cited above as well as the proscription against homosexuality in both Testaments, the Holy Spirit must be identified as functionally feminine.

     

    A Feminine Church suggests a feminine Holy Spirit

     

    The femininity of the spiritual Church was established in the article entitled The Church, the Bride, the Body and the New Jerusalem. The spiritual Church, being a feminine entity and the Bride of Christ, requires Jesus Christ to be gendered. This was the great mystery of which Paul spoke in Ephesians 5:31 and 32:

     

    For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and shall be joined unto his wife, and they two shall be one flesh. This is a great mystery, but I speak concerning Christ and His Church.

     

    This relationship between Christ and His Church elicits a profound question, one that can be answered rationally only one way: why, if Jesus partakes of both gender and marriage, would the Father and the Holy Spirit not?

    Given the male gender of the Father, the obvious answer is that the Holy Spirit is the feminine Spouse of the Father.

    The feminine Shekinah Glory points to a feminine Holy Spirit

    Perhaps the most significant suggestion of femininity in the Bible may be found in the property of indwelling, a characteristic of the Holy Spirit that strongly connects the New Testament with the Old.

    That the Old Testament Shekinah is the New Testament’s Holy Spirit is manifestly evident in the precursor role to the indwelling Holy Spirit of the Shekinah Glory who indwelt both the Tabernacle in the wilderness and Solomon’s Temple at their dedications. Since it has been claimed that the word Shekinah does not exist in the Hebrew Scriptures in its noun form (the situation there being similar to the absence in the Bible of a noun form of the word baptize), the following commentary will be made regarding its origin before proceeding with examples of the Shekinah presence.

    In the Hebrew Targum, the Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Old Testament, the word Shekinah is used as a noun. It means “intimate dwelling” or “the presence of the Glory (light)of the Lord”.   Justification for the use of this word is the use in the Hebrew Scriptures of its root word “shachan”, referring particularly to the pillars of cloud and fire that accompanied the Israelites in their journey from Egypt to the Promised Land through the wilderness. The prophet Isaiah referred to it quite graphically in Isaiah 4:5 and 6, linking this pillar of cloud and fire to a covering presence. It is generally understood that this same pillar is referenced in Isaiah 51:9 and 10, where the prophet goes out of his way to describe by feminine pronouns the same pillar of cloud and fire that accompanied the Israelites on their journey from Egypt. The Targum interpretation leaves no doubt that the Shekinah Glory is a feminine presence, and represents an equivalence with a feminine Holy Spirit. Isaiah 4:5 and 6, and 51:9 and 10 read as follows:

    “And the Lord will create upon every dwelling place of Mount Zion , and upon her assemblies, a cloud and smoke by day, and the shining of a flaming fire by night; for upon all the glory shall be a defense. And there shall be a tabernacle for a shadow in the daytime from the heat, and for a place of refuge, and for a covert from storm and from rain.”

              “Awake, awake, put on strength, O arm of the Lord; awake, as in the ancient days, in the generations of old. Art thou not she who hast cut Rahab, and wounded the dragon? Art thou not she who has dried the sea, the waters of the great deep; who hath made the depths of the sea a way for the ransomed to pass over?”

     

     

     

    Exodus 40 and 1 Kings 8 provide prominent examples of the Shekinah as a precursor to the indwelling Holy Spirit of the New Testament. Exodus 40:33-38 describes the indwelling of the Tabernacle in the wilderness:

    “And [Moses] reared up the court round about the tabernacle and the altar, and set up the hanging of the court gate. So Moses finished the work.

              “Then a cloud covered the tent of the congregation, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle. And when the cloud was taken up from over the tabernacle, the children of Israel went onward in all their journeys; but if the cloud were not taken up, then they journeyed not till the day that it was taken up. For the cloud of the Lord was upon the tabernacle by day, and fire was on it by night, in the sight of all the house of Israel, throughout all their journeys.”

    The description “cloud of the Lord” , “fire by night” and “taken up” leaves no doubt that this “cloud” is equivalent to the Shekinah of the Red Sea adventure and of Isaiah 4:5. The corresponding incident with respect to Solomon’s Temple, taken from 1 Kings 8:6-13, is given below:

    And the priests brought in the ark of the covenant of the Lord unto its place, into the inner sanctuary of the house, into the most holy place, even under the wings of the cherubim. For the cherubim spread forth their two wings of the place of the ark, and the cherubim covered the ark and its staves above. And they drew out the staves, that the ends of the staves were seen out in the holy place before the inner sanctuary, but they were not seen outside; and there they are unto this day. There was nothing in the ark except the two tables of stone, which Moses put there at Horeb, when the lord made a covenant with the children of Israel, when they came out of the land of Egypt. And it came to pass, when the priests were come out of the holy place, that the cloud filled the house of the lord, so that the priests could not stand to minister because of the cloud; for the glory of the Lord had filled the house of the Lord. Then spoke Solomon, The Lord said he would dwell in the thick darkness. I have surely built thee an house to dwell in, a settled place for thee to abide in forever.”

    In this passage the meaning of “cloud” is closely linked with “dwelling place” and “glory of the Lord”, which again point to the phrase Shekinah Glory.

    The connection between these precursor events and the Holy Spirit who indwells Christian believers is given in 1 Corinthians 3:16 and Ephesians 2:19-22, wherein Paul asserts that the Church herself, through her constituents, is a temple indwelt by the Holy Spirit:

    Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you?

     

     

     

               Now, therefore, ye are no more strangers and sojourners, but fellow citizens with the saints, and of the household of God; and are built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ himself being the chief corner stone, in whom all the building fitly framed together groweth unto an holy temple in the Lord; in whom ye also are built together for an habitation of God through the Spirit.

    The facts embedded in these passages are no surprise to Christians, who generally accept without question that believers are indwelt with the Holy Spirit and comprise, as the Church, a holy temple. What some of us may not be aware of is that this temple and its indwelling by the Holy Spirit was represented numerous times as the Glory of God in the Old Testament. Turning to the Internet, the Wikipedia entry for “Shekinah” begins as follows:

    “Hebrew [Shekinah] is the English spelling of a grammatically feminine Hebrew ancient blessing. The original word means the dwelling or settling, and denotes the dwelling or settling of the divine presence of God, especially in the temple in Jerusalem.” An accompanying figure shows the Shekinah, or the Glory of God, indwelling the temple as described in 1 Kings 8.”

    Noting the female gender of this indwelling Shekinah, we find here by comparing the indwelling presence of the Glory in Solomon’s temple with the description in Ephesians 2 of the Holy Spirit indwelling the human temple that Scripture itself, by furnishing this direct comparison, supports an interpretation of the Holy Spirit as a female Entity in the face of conventional Christian thought, as driven by the use in Scripture of the male pronoun in reference to the Holy Spirit.

    This feminine gender attribute in Exodus 40 and 1 Kings 8 may have been simply lost in the translation from Hebrew (Aramaic) to English, which could have been a result of the lack of gender precision in the English language. (Actually, the first transference from feminine to masculine occurred in the Latin, for which the Holy Spirit was definitely presented as male.) But there is an associated gender misrepresentation in Isaiah 51:9, 10 that appears to be more deliberate. What the translators did in that passage was to substitute the grammatically incorrect ‘it’ for the gender-correct ‘she’ in reference to Shekinah. In their desire to maintain a fully masculine Godhead, they neutered the female. In the process, they inadvertently managed also to castrate their masculine God. As just one example of this removal of gender, Isaiah 51:9 and 10 refers to a neuter Arm of the Lord rather than the original feminine gender.

    Proverbs points to the femininity of the Holy Spirit

    The Book of Proverbs beautifully and harmoniously supports a female functional designation for the Holy Spirit., as the subject of this book is uniformly feminine, and whose functionality closely parallels that of the Holy Spirit. Of particular interest in this regard are Proverbs 3 and 8, from which the following excerpts are taken:

     

     

     

    “Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, and the man that getteth understanding. . .She is more precious than rubies: and all the things thou canst desire are not to be compared unto her. . .The Lord by wisdom hath founded the earth; by understanding hath he established the heavens. . .Doth not wisdom cry? And understanding put forth her voice? . . .The Lord possessed me in the beginning of his way, before his works of old. I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning, or ever the earth was. When there were no depths, I was brought forth; when there were no fountains abounding with water. Before the mountains were settled, before the hills was I brought forth: While as yet he had not made the earth, nor the fields, nor the highest part of the dust of the world. When he prepared the heavens, I was there: when he set a compass upon the face of the depth: When he established the clouds above: when he strengthened the fountains of the deep: When he gave the sea his decree, that the waters should not pass his commandment: when he appointed the foundations of the earth: Then I was by him, as one brought up with him: and I was daily his delight, rejoicing always before him; Rejoicing in the habitable part of his earth; and my delights were with the sons of men. Now therefore hearken unto me, O ye children: for blessed are they that keep my ways. Hear instruction, and be wise, and refuse it not. Blessed is the man that heareth me, watching daily at my gates, waiting at the posts of my doors. For whoso findeth me findeth life, and shall obtain favor of the Lord. But he that sinneth against me wrongeth his own soul: all they that hate me love death.”

     

    Several items come to mind from the above review of these passages in Proverbs. The first is that the Persona is female throughout; an attempt to assign some of these passages to Jesus Christ, as many do, would constitute an unnatural force-fit, most obviously in the issue of gender, but also with respect to function and role. The second is directly related to function, wherein the passages suggest a connection between Wisdom and the Holy Spirit as furnishing the most likely Person to which a female function may be assigned; the third is that the Holy Spirit was active in creation itself, as summarized in Genesis 1:1-3:

    “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.”

    Jesus Himself, in Luke 7:35, associates Wisdom with motherhood, an eminently personal attribute.

    “But wisdom is justified of all her children.”

     While that verse possibly could be interpreted as being merely a figure of speech, Jesus in Luke 11:49 and 50 more emphatically personifies Wisdom:

    Therefore also said the wisdom of God, I will send them prophets and apostles, and some of them they shall slay and persecute, that the blood of all the prophets, which was shed from the foundation of the world, may be required of this generation.”

     

    In further support of my equation of Wisdom with the Holy Spirit, I cite Isaiah 11:1 and 2:

    “And there shall come forth a rod out of the stem of Jesse, and a Branch shall grow out of his roots; And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest upon him, the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and of the fear of the Lord,. . .”

    Another item that presents itself in a reading of Proverbs with an eye to the Personhood of Wisdom is the implied intimacy between mankind and Wisdom in the warning given in Proverbs 8:36: he that sins against Wisdom wrongs his own soul. Could this imply that our own purpose and function in the spiritual realm might actually parallel that of the Holy Spirit? There may well be a correlation between this caution and the one expressed by Jesus in Matthew 12:31 and 32:

    “Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men. And whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him: but whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the world to come.”

    These are strong words, and they make a strong connection between Wisdom and the Holy Spirit.

    “And in your wisdom have established humankind . . .Give me Wisdom, the consort at your throne . . . Now with you is Wisdom, who knows your works and was present when you made the world; Who understands what is pleasing in your eyes and what is conformable with your commands. Send her forth from your holy heavens and from your glorious throne dispatch her that she may be with me and work with me, that I may know what is pleasing to you. For she knows and understands all things, and will guide me prudently in my affairs and safeguard me to her glory . . . Or who can know your counsel, unless you give Wisdom and send your holy spirit from on high?

    – Wisdom 9:2, 4, 9-11, 17

    First nine chapters of Proverbs focus on Wisdom

    Proverbs 4:13 she is your life, giver of life

    Proverbs 8:35 whoever finds me finds life

    Proverbs 8:15 decrees what is right

    Proverbs 8: 22 – 31 like Wisdom herself, before the foundation of the earth I was there. Wisdom comes from God.

    Wisdom 7:22 – 8:1 She is the fashioner of all things; 21 attributes which is the product of two perfect numbers 3 & 7. Wisdom is perfection multiplied by perfection. Intelligent, holy, unique, manifold, subtle, mobile, clear, unpolluted, distinct, invulnerable, loving good, keen, irresistible, beneficent, humane, steadfast, sure, free from anxiety, all powerful. Overseeing all, penetrating through all other intelligent spirits

     

    Wisdom 8:1 She orders all things

     

    Wisdom 7: 24 She pervades and penetrates all things

     

    Wisdom 7:27 She renews all things – renewable energy

     

    Wisdom 9:10 She shares the throne of God

     

    Wisdom 7:10 – 14 She’s the source of all things new

     

    Sirach 1:1 – 8 It is God who knows wisdom and pours her forth upon the world

     

    Sirach 24: 1 – 27 Hymn of self-praise sung by Wisdom in which she describes herself, her origins, her relationship to God and the good things she does for human beings. She came from the mouth of God, she is God’s word, breath, Spirit; as the spirit/wind that hovered over the waters of creation and as mist / steam that covered the earth at the beginning; she is universal, everywhere. Her image as a tree echoes Proverbs 8 – she strikes root among God’s people. She feeds all who long for her. Her food is sweeter than honey. Her food is herself. All who eat of her will hunger still, who drink of her will thirst for more. One will never be able to get enough of what she offers. What she offers is life. She concludes her song with a promise similar to Proverbs 8:35 – 34 – those who obey her will not be shamed. Those who serve her will not fall short. I believe she is the personification of God’s wisdom as the feminine archetype.

     

    Birthing God – womb

     

    • Gen 7:1 – Breasts illuminate a feminine image of God

     

    • Deut. 32:18 “You forget the rock who begot you, unmindful of the God who gave birth to you”

     

     

     

    • Job 38:8 “Who shut in the sea with doors when it burst out from the womb?”

     

    • Job 38: 28-29 God’s fathering of rain and giving birth to ice from her womb

     

    • Isaiah 42:14 “I groan like a woman in labor; I will gasp and pant”

     

    • Isaiah 46: 3-4: “You who have been carried since birth, whom I have carried since time you were born” – incubating in God’s womb

     

    • John 1:12: Those who believe in God are born of God

     

    • John 4:7: Everyone who loves is born of God

     

    • John 16:21: God is bringing forth a new humanity like the pangs of a woman in labor; her hour has come

     

    • Acts 17: In God we live and move and have our being

     

    • Gal 4:19: God’s womb is in pain

     

    • Romans 8:22 From the beginning to now the entire creation has been groaning in one great act of giving birth (creation)

     

     

     

    Creator God of Israel is also imaged as the shaper, maker and mother God who formed Israel in the womb and birthed Israel with labor pains:

     

    • (Deut. 32:18; Psalm 90:2; Proverbs 8:24 – 25; Isaiah 43:1,7,15; 44:2, 24; 45:9, 11; 51:13; 54:5 From the word “womb” (rehem) comes the verb “to have compassion” (raham), and the phrase “Yahweh’s compassionate (rahum) and gracious” repeatedly appears in the Hebrew scripture to describe the merciful and saving acts of God in history. (Deut. 4:31; 2 Chronicles 30:9;  Nehemiah 9:17; Ps 78:38; 86:16; 103:8; 111:4; 112:4; 145:8; John 4:7 These verses show images of God who demonstrates “womb – like compassion” for her child Israel.

     

    • God creator is sometimes depicted as woman giving birth and sometimes a reproductive image of God as both male and female: Deut 32:18; Job 38:28 – 29; Is 42:14; Acts 17; John 16:21; Gal 4:19; Rom 8:22; John 1:12

    Nursing mother:

    • Isaiah 49:15 does a woman forget her baby at the breast, or fail to cherish the son (daughter) of her womb

    • Numbers 11:12 was it I who conceived all this people, was it I who gave them birth that you should say to me, carry them in your bosom like a nurse with a baby at the breast

    • Psalm 131:2 – 3 But I have clamed and quieted my soul, like a weaned child with its mother; my soul within me is like a weaned child.

    • John 7: 38 From his breast shall flow the fountains of living water

    • 1 Peter 2:2 – 3 You are newborn and like babies you should be hungry for nothing but milk – now that you have tasted the goodness of Christ

    Nurturing God – mother:

    • Gen 1 :2 nesting mother

    • Deut 32 : 11 – 12 mother eagle

    • Hosea 11:34 I myself taught Ephram to walk, I took them in my arms

    • Hosea 13: 8 I will fall upon them like a bear robbed of her cubs

     

    • Psalm 131 image of repose – like a child in its mother’s arms as content as a child that has been weaned

    • Ps 17:8 guard me in the shadow of your wings

    • Ps 36:7 all people may take refuge in the shadow of your wings

    • Ps 57:1 in the shadow of your wings I will take refuge

    • Ps 61:4 find refuge under the shelter of your wings

    • Isaiah 31:5 like birds hovering overhead, so the Lord of hosts will protect Jerusalem

     

    • Isaiah 46:3 – 4 who have been borne by me from your birth carried from the womb… even when you turn gray, I will carry you. I have made and I will bear, I will carry and will save

    • Isaiah 66: 10 –13 comforting mother…… as a mother comforts her child, so will I comfort you

    • Luke 15:8 woman tirelessly sweeping for her lost coin, for what is important to her

     

    • Luke 13: 34 (Matt 23:37), how often I desired to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings

    Other images:

    • Ruah – Gen 2:7, Ps 104: 29; Jn 3:8 presence gives life; feminine Hebrew word meaning breath, wind, inspiration or spirit.

    • Rahamin Hebrew word for compassion – root word, rahan, means womb.

    • El Shaddai – God of the mountains or God of the breasts

    • Seamstress – Gen 3:21

    • Washerwoman Isaiah 4:4, Psalm 51:7

    • Midwife Psalm 22:9 – 11, Psalm 71:6; Isaiah 66:9

    • Woman baking bread Matt 13:33

    • Seeks justice Proverbs 8:18

     

     

     

    The holy spirit is described by John as the helper:

    26 But the helper, the holy spirit, which the Father will send in my name, that one will teach you all things and bring back to your minds all the things I told you (John 14).

    But Adam's wife was described in the same way:

    18 And Jehovah God went on to say: It is not good for the man to continue by himself. I am going to make a helper for him, as a complement of him (Genesis 2).

    This is not a coincidence. Just as Eve was a complement and helper to Adam so the holy spirit is God's helper, and a complement to him. It is his wife. It is Jesus' mum. The 3, God, The Holy Spirit and Jesus, are a family. They are Father Mother and Son, for Jesus did not come from a single parent family as all churches would have you believe.

    MEET YOUR PERFECT MOTHER, THE HOLY SPIRIT

    Published: Feb 11, 2019

    A disciple [asked] the Lord for something worldly. Yeshua says to him, “Request of thy Mother and she will give to thee from what belongs to another.”

     

    Philip 38

    Yeshua says…For my mother bore my body, yet my True Mother gave me the life.

     

    Thomas 101

    In the days when we were Hebrews, we were left fatherless, having only our Mother (the Sacred Spirit). Yet when we became Christics (Messianics), Father came to be with Mother for us.

     

    Philip 6

    Honor your father and your mother, so that you may live long in the land the Lord your God is giving you.

    Exodus 20:12

    She alone is the truth. She makes the multitude, and concerning us she teaches this alone in a love through many.

    Philip 12

    In fact, God’s character and actions are revealed by feminine imagery in at least 26 places:

    Numbers 11:12- 11 He asked the Lord, “Why have you brought this trouble on your servant? What have I done to displease you that you put the burden of all these people on me? 12 Did I conceive all these people? Did I give them birth? Why do you tell me to carry them in my arms, as a nurse carries an infant, to the land you promised on oath to their ancestors?

    Deuteronomy 32:18 - 18 You deserted the Rock, who fathered you;  you forgot the God who gave you birth.

    Ruth 2:12 - 12 May the Lord repay you for what you have done. May you be richly rewarded by the Lord, the God of Israel, under whose wings you have come to take refuge.”

     

    Job 38:8 - 8 “Who shut up the sea behind doors when it burst forth from the womb,

     

    Job 38:28–29 - 28 Does the rain have a father ? Who fathers the drops of dew?29 From whose womb comes the ice? Who gives birth to the frost from the heavens

     

    Psalm 17:8 - 8 Keep me as the apple of your eye;  hide me in the shadow of your wings

     

    Psalm 22:9–10 - 9 Yet you brought me out of the womb;  you made me trust in you, even at my mother’s breast. 10 From birth I was cast on you; from my mother’s womb you have been my God.

     

    Psalm 90:2 - 2 Before the mountains were born  or you brought forth the whole world, from everlasting to everlasting you are God.

     

    Psalm 91:4 - 4 He will cover you with his feathers   and under his wings you will find refuge;  his faithfulness will be your shield and rampart.

     

    Psalm 123:2 - As the eyes of slaves look to the hand of their master,  as the eyes of a female slave look to the hand of her mistress,so our eyes look to the Lord our God, till he shows us his mercy.

     

    Psalm 131:2–3 - 2 But I have calmed and quieted myself,I am like a weaned child with its mother; like a weaned child I am content.3 Israel, put your hope in the Lord both now and forevermore.

     

    Proverbs 8:1 - Does not wisdom call out?  Does not understanding raise her voice?

     

    Proverbs 8:22–25 - 22 “The Lord brought me forth as the first of his works,[a][b]before his deeds of old;

     

    23 I was brought forth long ages ago, at the very beginning, when the world came to be.24 When there were no watery depths, I was brought forth  when there were no springs overflowing with water;25 before the mountains were settled in place  before the hills, I was brought forth,

     

    Isaiah 31:5 - 5 Like birds hovering overhead,the Lord Almighty will shield Jerusalem;

     

    he will shield it and deliver it,he will ‘pass over’ it and will rescue it.”

     

    Isaiah 42:13–14 - 13 The Lord will march out like a champion, like a warrior he will stir up his zeal; with a shout he will raise the battle cry and will triumph over his enemies.14 “For a long time I have kept silent, I have been quiet and held myself back.But now, like a woman in childbirth,I cry out, I gasp and pant.

     

    Isaiah 45:10 - Woe to the one who says to a father  ‘What have you begotten?’or to a mother,

     

        ‘What have you brought to birth?’

     

    Isaiah 46:3 - 3 “Listen to me, you descendants of Jacob,all the remnant of the people of Israel,you whom I have upheld since your birth, and have carried since you were born.

     

    Isaiah 49:15 - 15 “Can a mother forget the baby at her breast and have no compassion on the child she has borne? Though she may forget,  I will not forget you!

     

    Isaiah 63:15 - 15 Look down from heaven and see,  from your lofty throne, holy and glorious.Where are your zeal and your might?Your tenderness and compassion are withheld from us.

     

    Isaiah 66:7–13 - 7 “Before she goes into labor,she gives birth; before the pains come upon her, she delivers a son.8 Who has ever heard of such things? Who has ever seen things like this? Can a country be born in a day or a nation be brought forth in a moment? Yet no sooner is Zion in labor than she gives birth to her children.9 Do I bring to the moment of birth and not give delivery?” says the Lord.“Do I close up the womb when I bring to delivery?” says your God. 10 “Rejoice with Jerusalem and be glad for her, all you who love her; rejoice greatly with her, all you who mourn over her. 11 For you will nurse and be satisfied at her comforting breasts; you will drink deeply  and delight in her overflowing abundance.” 12 For this is what the Lord says: “I will extend peace to her like a river, and the wealth of nations like a flooding stream; you will nurse and be carried on her arm and dandled on her knees. 13 As a mother comforts her child, so will I comfort you; and you will be comforted over Jerusalem.”

     

    Hosea 13:8 - 8 Like a bear robbed of her cubs  I will attack them and rip them open; like a lion I will devour them—  a wild animal will tear them apart.

     

    Matthew 23:37 - 37 “Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, and you were not willing.

     

    Luke 13:34 - 34 “Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, and you were not willing.

     

    Luke 15:8–10 - 8 “Or suppose a woman has ten silver coins[a] and loses one. Doesn’t she light a lamp, sweep the house and search carefully until she finds it? 9 And when she finds it, she calls her friends and neighbors together and says, ‘Rejoice with me; I have found my lost coin.’ 10 In the same way, I tell you, there is rejoicing in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents.”

     

    John 3:3–8 - 3 Jesus replied, “Very truly I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born again.[a]”4 “How can someone be born when they are old?” Nicodemus asked. “Surely they cannot enter a second time into their mother’s womb to be born!”5 Jesus answered, “Very truly I tell you, no one can enter the kingdom of God unless they are born of water and the Spirit. 6 Flesh gives birth to flesh, but the Spirit[b] gives birth to spirit. 7 You should not be surprised at my saying, ‘You[c] must be born again.’ 8 The wind blows wherever it pleases. You hear its sound, but you cannot tell where it comes from or where it is going. So it is with everyone born of the Spirit.”[d]

     

    1 Peter 2:2–3 - 2 Like newborn babies, crave pure spiritual milk, so that by it you may grow up in your salvation, 3 now that you have tasted that the Lord is good.

     

     

     

    The nature of the spiritual birth by the Holy Spirit points directly to a feminine Holy Spirit

     

    Quoting from John 3:

     

    There was a man of the Pharisees, named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews; the same came to Jesus by night, and said unto him, Rabbi, we know that thou art a teacher come from God; for no man can do these miracles that thou doest, except God be with him. Jesus answered, and said unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God. Nicodemus saith unto him, How can a man be born when he is old? Can he enter the second time into his mother’s womb, and be born? Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God. That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit. Marvel not that I said unto you, Ye must be born again. The wind bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound of it, but canst not tell from where it cometh, and where it goeth; so is every one that is born of the Spirit. Nicodemus answered, and said unto him, How can these things be? Jesus answered, and said unto him, Art thou a teacher of Israel, and knowest not these things? Verily, verily, I say unto thee, We speak that which we do know, and testify to that which we have seen; and ye receive not our witness.

     

    Acts Chapter 2 makes a singular association between this rebirth described in John 3 and the Holy Spirit, identifying the Holy Spirit as the Birther. Because gender weakness is frowned upon in the passages cited above as well as the proscription against homosexuality in both Testaments, the Holy Spirit must be identified as functionally feminine.

     

    A Feminine Church suggests a feminine Holy Spirit

     

    The femininity of the spiritual Church was established in the article entitled The Church, the Bride, the Body and the New Jerusalem. The spiritual Church, being a feminine entity and the Bride of Christ, requires Jesus Christ to be gendered. This was the great mystery of which Paul spoke in Ephesians 5:31 and 32:

     

    For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and shall be joined unto his wife, and they two shall be one flesh. This is a great mystery, but I speak concerning Christ and His Church.

     

    This relationship between Christ and His Church elicits a profound question, one that can be answered rationally only one way: why, if Jesus partakes of both gender and marriage, would the Father and the Holy Spirit not?

    Given the male gender of the Father, the obvious answer is that the Holy Spirit is the feminine Spouse of the Father.

    The feminine Shekinah Glory points to a feminine Holy Spirit

    Perhaps the most significant suggestion of femininity in the Bible may be found in the property of indwelling, a characteristic of the Holy Spirit that strongly connects the New Testament with the Old.

    That the Old Testament Shekinah is the New Testament’s Holy Spirit is manifestly evident in the precursor role to the indwelling Holy Spirit of the Shekinah Glory who indwelt both the Tabernacle in the wilderness and Solomon’s Temple at their dedications. Since it has been claimed that the word Shekinah does not exist in the Hebrew Scriptures in its noun form (the situation there being similar to the absence in the Bible of a noun form of the word baptize), the following commentary will be made regarding its origin before proceeding with examples of the Shekinah presence.

    In the Hebrew Targum, the Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Old Testament, the word Shekinah is used as a noun. It means “intimate dwelling” or “the presence of the Glory (light)of the Lord”.   Justification for the use of this word is the use in the Hebrew Scriptures of its root word “shachan”, referring particularly to the pillars of cloud and fire that accompanied the Israelites in their journey from Egypt to the Promised Land through the wilderness. The prophet Isaiah referred to it quite graphically in Isaiah 4:5 and 6, linking this pillar of cloud and fire to a covering presence. It is generally understood that this same pillar is referenced in Isaiah 51:9 and 10, where the prophet goes out of his way to describe by feminine pronouns the same pillar of cloud and fire that accompanied the Israelites on their journey from Egypt. The Targum interpretation leaves no doubt that the Shekinah Glory is a feminine presence, and represents an equivalence with a feminine Holy Spirit. Isaiah 4:5 and 6, and 51:9 and 10 read as follows:

    “And the Lord will create upon every dwelling place of Mount Zion , and upon her assemblies, a cloud and smoke by day, and the shining of a flaming fire by night; for upon all the glory shall be a defense. And there shall be a tabernacle for a shadow in the daytime from the heat, and for a place of refuge, and for a covert from storm and from rain.”

              “Awake, awake, put on strength, O arm of the Lord; awake, as in the ancient days, in the generations of old. Art thou not she who hast cut Rahab, and wounded the dragon? Art thou not she who has dried the sea, the waters of the great deep; who hath made the depths of the sea a way for the ransomed to pass over?”

     

     

     

    Exodus 40 and 1 Kings 8 provide prominent examples of the Shekinah as a precursor to the indwelling Holy Spirit of the New Testament. Exodus 40:33-38 describes the indwelling of the Tabernacle in the wilderness:

    “And [Moses] reared up the court round about the tabernacle and the altar, and set up the hanging of the court gate. So Moses finished the work.

              “Then a cloud covered the tent of the congregation, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle. And when the cloud was taken up from over the tabernacle, the children of Israel went onward in all their journeys; but if the cloud were not taken up, then they journeyed not till the day that it was taken up. For the cloud of the Lord was upon the tabernacle by day, and fire was on it by night, in the sight of all the house of Israel, throughout all their journeys.”

    The description “cloud of the Lord” , “fire by night” and “taken up” leaves no doubt that this “cloud” is equivalent to the Shekinah of the Red Sea adventure and of Isaiah 4:5. The corresponding incident with respect to Solomon’s Temple, taken from 1 Kings 8:6-13, is given below:

    And the priests brought in the ark of the covenant of the Lord unto its place, into the inner sanctuary of the house, into the most holy place, even under the wings of the cherubim. For the cherubim spread forth their two wings of the place of the ark, and the cherubim covered the ark and its staves above. And they drew out the staves, that the ends of the staves were seen out in the holy place before the inner sanctuary, but they were not seen outside; and there they are unto this day. There was nothing in the ark except the two tables of stone, which Moses put there at Horeb, when the lord made a covenant with the children of Israel, when they came out of the land of Egypt. And it came to pass, when the priests were come out of the holy place, that the cloud filled the house of the lord, so that the priests could not stand to minister because of the cloud; for the glory of the Lord had filled the house of the Lord. Then spoke Solomon, The Lord said he would dwell in the thick darkness. I have surely built thee an house to dwell in, a settled place for thee to abide in forever.”

    In this passage the meaning of “cloud” is closely linked with “dwelling place” and “glory of the Lord”, which again point to the phrase Shekinah Glory.

    The connection between these precursor events and the Holy Spirit who indwells Christian believers is given in 1 Corinthians 3:16 and Ephesians 2:19-22, wherein Paul asserts that the Church herself, through her constituents, is a temple indwelt by the Holy Spirit:

    Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you?

     

     

     

               Now, therefore, ye are no more strangers and sojourners, but fellow citizens with the saints, and of the household of God; and are built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ himself being the chief corner stone, in whom all the building fitly framed together groweth unto an holy temple in the Lord; in whom ye also are built together for an habitation of God through the Spirit.

    The facts embedded in these passages are no surprise to Christians, who generally accept without question that believers are indwelt with the Holy Spirit and comprise, as the Church, a holy temple. What some of us may not be aware of is that this temple and its indwelling by the Holy Spirit was represented numerous times as the Glory of God in the Old Testament. Turning to the Internet, the Wikipedia entry for “Shekinah” begins as follows:

    “Hebrew [Shekinah] is the English spelling of a grammatically feminine Hebrew ancient blessing. The original word means the dwelling or settling, and denotes the dwelling or settling of the divine presence of God, especially in the temple in Jerusalem.” An accompanying figure shows the Shekinah, or the Glory of God, indwelling the temple as described in 1 Kings 8.”

    Noting the female gender of this indwelling Shekinah, we find here by comparing the indwelling presence of the Glory in Solomon’s temple with the description in Ephesians 2 of the Holy Spirit indwelling the human temple that Scripture itself, by furnishing this direct comparison, supports an interpretation of the Holy Spirit as a female Entity in the face of conventional Christian thought, as driven by the use in Scripture of the male pronoun in reference to the Holy Spirit.

    This feminine gender attribute in Exodus 40 and 1 Kings 8 may have been simply lost in the translation from Hebrew (Aramaic) to English, which could have been a result of the lack of gender precision in the English language. (Actually, the first transference from feminine to masculine occurred in the Latin, for which the Holy Spirit was definitely presented as male.) But there is an associated gender misrepresentation in Isaiah 51:9, 10 that appears to be more deliberate. What the translators did in that passage was to substitute the grammatically incorrect ‘it’ for the gender-correct ‘she’ in reference to Shekinah. In their desire to maintain a fully masculine Godhead, they neutered the female. In the process, they inadvertently managed also to castrate their masculine God. As just one example of this removal of gender, Isaiah 51:9 and 10 refers to a neuter Arm of the Lord rather than the original feminine gender.

    Proverbs points to the femininity of the Holy Spirit

    The Book of Proverbs beautifully and harmoniously supports a female functional designation for the Holy Spirit., as the subject of this book is uniformly feminine, and whose functionality closely parallels that of the Holy Spirit. Of particular interest in this regard are Proverbs 3 and 8, from which the following excerpts are taken:

     

     

     

    “Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, and the man that getteth understanding. . .She is more precious than rubies: and all the things thou canst desire are not to be compared unto her. . .The Lord by wisdom hath founded the earth; by understanding hath he established the heavens. . .Doth not wisdom cry? And understanding put forth her voice? . . .The Lord possessed me in the beginning of his way, before his works of old. I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning, or ever the earth was. When there were no depths, I was brought forth; when there were no fountains abounding with water. Before the mountains were settled, before the hills was I brought forth: While as yet he had not made the earth, nor the fields, nor the highest part of the dust of the world. When he prepared the heavens, I was there: when he set a compass upon the face of the depth: When he established the clouds above: when he strengthened the fountains of the deep: When he gave the sea his decree, that the waters should not pass his commandment: when he appointed the foundations of the earth: Then I was by him, as one brought up with him: and I was daily his delight, rejoicing always before him; Rejoicing in the habitable part of his earth; and my delights were with the sons of men. Now therefore hearken unto me, O ye children: for blessed are they that keep my ways. Hear instruction, and be wise, and refuse it not. Blessed is the man that heareth me, watching daily at my gates, waiting at the posts of my doors. For whoso findeth me findeth life, and shall obtain favor of the Lord. But he that sinneth against me wrongeth his own soul: all they that hate me love death.”

     

    Several items come to mind from the above review of these passages in Proverbs. The first is that the Persona is female throughout; an attempt to assign some of these passages to Jesus Christ, as many do, would constitute an unnatural force-fit, most obviously in the issue of gender, but also with respect to function and role. The second is directly related to function, wherein the passages suggest a connection between Wisdom and the Holy Spirit as furnishing the most likely Person to which a female function may be assigned; the third is that the Holy Spirit was active in creation itself, as summarized in Genesis 1:1-3:

    “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.”

    Jesus Himself, in Luke 7:35, associates Wisdom with motherhood, an eminently personal attribute.

    “But wisdom is justified of all her children.”

     While that verse possibly could be interpreted as being merely a figure of speech, Jesus in Luke 11:49 and 50 more emphatically personifies Wisdom:

    Therefore also said the wisdom of God, I will send them prophets and apostles, and some of them they shall slay and persecute, that the blood of all the prophets, which was shed from the foundation of the world, may be required of this generation.”

     

    In further support of my equation of Wisdom with the Holy Spirit, I cite Isaiah 11:1 and 2:

    “And there shall come forth a rod out of the stem of Jesse, and a Branch shall grow out of his roots; And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest upon him, the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and of the fear of the Lord,. . .”

    Another item that presents itself in a reading of Proverbs with an eye to the Personhood of Wisdom is the implied intimacy between mankind and Wisdom in the warning given in Proverbs 8:36: he that sins against Wisdom wrongs his own soul. Could this imply that our own purpose and function in the spiritual realm might actually parallel that of the Holy Spirit? There may well be a correlation between this caution and the one expressed by Jesus in Matthew 12:31 and 32:

    “Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men. And whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him: but whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the world to come.”

    These are strong words, and they make a strong connection between Wisdom and the Holy Spirit.

    “And in your wisdom have established humankind . . .Give me Wisdom, the consort at your throne . . . Now with you is Wisdom, who knows your works and was present when you made the world; Who understands what is pleasing in your eyes and what is conformable with your commands. Send her forth from your holy heavens and from your glorious throne dispatch her that she may be with me and work with me, that I may know what is pleasing to you. For she knows and understands all things, and will guide me prudently in my affairs and safeguard me to her glory . . . Or who can know your counsel, unless you give Wisdom and send your holy spirit from on high?

    – Wisdom 9:2, 4, 9-11, 17

    First nine chapters of Proverbs focus on Wisdom

    Proverbs 4:13 she is your life, giver of life

    Proverbs 8:35 whoever finds me finds life

    Proverbs 8:15 decrees what is right

    Proverbs 8: 22 – 31 like Wisdom herself, before the foundation of the earth I was there. Wisdom comes from God.

    Wisdom 7:22 – 8:1 She is the fashioner of all things; 21 attributes which is the product of two perfect numbers 3 & 7. Wisdom is perfection multiplied by perfection. Intelligent, holy, unique, manifold, subtle, mobile, clear, unpolluted, distinct, invulnerable, loving good, keen, irresistible, beneficent, humane, steadfast, sure, free from anxiety, all powerful. Overseeing all, penetrating through all other intelligent spirits

     

    Wisdom 8:1 She orders all things

     

    Wisdom 7: 24 She pervades and penetrates all things

     

    Wisdom 7:27 She renews all things – renewable energy

     

    Wisdom 9:10 She shares the throne of God

     

    Wisdom 7:10 – 14 She’s the source of all things new

     

    Sirach 1:1 – 8 It is God who knows wisdom and pours her forth upon the world

     

    Sirach 24: 1 – 27 Hymn of self-praise sung by Wisdom in which she describes herself, her origins, her relationship to God and the good things she does for human beings. She came from the mouth of God, she is God’s word, breath, Spirit; as the spirit/wind that hovered over the waters of creation and as mist / steam that covered the earth at the beginning; she is universal, everywhere. Her image as a tree echoes Proverbs 8 – she strikes root among God’s people. She feeds all who long for her. Her food is sweeter than honey. Her food is herself. All who eat of her will hunger still, who drink of her will thirst for more. One will never be able to get enough of what she offers. What she offers is life. She concludes her song with a promise similar to Proverbs 8:35 – 34 – those who obey her will not be shamed. Those who serve her will not fall short. I believe she is the personification of God’s wisdom as the feminine archetype.

     

    Birthing God – womb

     

    • Gen 7:1 – Breasts illuminate a feminine image of God

     

    • Deut. 32:18 “You forget the rock who begot you, unmindful of the God who gave birth to you”

     

     

     

    • Job 38:8 “Who shut in the sea with doors when it burst out from the womb?”

     

    • Job 38: 28-29 God’s fathering of rain and giving birth to ice from her womb

     

    • Isaiah 42:14 “I groan like a woman in labor; I will gasp and pant”

     

    • Isaiah 46: 3-4: “You who have been carried since birth, whom I have carried since time you were born” – incubating in God’s womb

     

    • John 1:12: Those who believe in God are born of God

     

    • John 4:7: Everyone who loves is born of God

     

    • John 16:21: God is bringing forth a new humanity like the pangs of a woman in labor; her hour has come

     

    • Acts 17: In God we live and move and have our being

     

    • Gal 4:19: God’s womb is in pain

     

    • Romans 8:22 From the beginning to now the entire creation has been groaning in one great act of giving birth (creation)

     

     

     

    Creator God of Israel is also imaged as the shaper, maker and mother God who formed Israel in the womb and birthed Israel with labor pains:

     

    • (Deut. 32:18; Psalm 90:2; Proverbs 8:24 – 25; Isaiah 43:1,7,15; 44:2, 24; 45:9, 11; 51:13; 54:5 From the word “womb” (rehem) comes the verb “to have compassion” (raham), and the phrase “Yahweh’s compassionate (rahum) and gracious” repeatedly appears in the Hebrew scripture to describe the merciful and saving acts of God in history. (Deut. 4:31; 2 Chronicles 30:9;  Nehemiah 9:17; Ps 78:38; 86:16; 103:8; 111:4; 112:4; 145:8; John 4:7 These verses show images of God who demonstrates “womb – like compassion” for her child Israel.

     

    • God creator is sometimes depicted as woman giving birth and sometimes a reproductive image of God as both male and female: Deut 32:18; Job 38:28 – 29; Is 42:14; Acts 17; John 16:21; Gal 4:19; Rom 8:22; John 1:12

    Nursing mother:

    • Isaiah 49:15 does a woman forget her baby at the breast, or fail to cherish the son (daughter) of her womb

    • Numbers 11:12 was it I who conceived all this people, was it I who gave them birth that you should say to me, carry them in your bosom like a nurse with a baby at the breast

    • Psalm 131:2 – 3 But I have clamed and quieted my soul, like a weaned child with its mother; my soul within me is like a weaned child.

    • John 7: 38 From his breast shall flow the fountains of living water

    • 1 Peter 2:2 – 3 You are newborn and like babies you should be hungry for nothing but milk – now that you have tasted the goodness of Christ

    Nurturing God – mother:

    • Gen 1 :2 nesting mother

    • Deut 32 : 11 – 12 mother eagle

    • Hosea 11:34 I myself taught Ephram to walk, I took them in my arms

    • Hosea 13: 8 I will fall upon them like a bear robbed of her cubs

     

    • Psalm 131 image of repose – like a child in its mother’s arms as content as a child that has been weaned

    • Ps 17:8 guard me in the shadow of your wings

    • Ps 36:7 all people may take refuge in the shadow of your wings

    • Ps 57:1 in the shadow of your wings I will take refuge

    • Ps 61:4 find refuge under the shelter of your wings

    • Isaiah 31:5 like birds hovering overhead, so the Lord of hosts will protect Jerusalem

     

    • Isaiah 46:3 – 4 who have been borne by me from your birth carried from the womb… even when you turn gray, I will carry you. I have made and I will bear, I will carry and will save

    • Isaiah 66: 10 –13 comforting mother…… as a mother comforts her child, so will I comfort you

    • Luke 15:8 woman tirelessly sweeping for her lost coin, for what is important to her

     

    • Luke 13: 34 (Matt 23:37), how often I desired to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings

    Other images:

    • Ruah – Gen 2:7, Ps 104: 29; Jn 3:8 presence gives life; feminine Hebrew word meaning breath, wind, inspiration or spirit.

    • Rahamin Hebrew word for compassion – root word, rahan, means womb.

    • El Shaddai – God of the mountains or God of the breasts

    • Seamstress – Gen 3:21

    • Washerwoman Isaiah 4:4, Psalm 51:7

    • Midwife Psalm 22:9 – 11, Psalm 71:6; Isaiah 66:9

    • Woman baking bread Matt 13:33

    • Seeks justice Proverbs 8:18

     

     

     

    The holy spirit is described by John as the helper:

    26 But the helper, the holy spirit, which the Father will send in my name, that one will teach you all things and bring back to your minds all the things I told you (John 14).

    But Adam's wife was described in the same way:

    18 And Jehovah God went on to say: It is not good for the man to continue by himself. I am going to make a helper for him, as a complement of him (Genesis 2).

    This is not a coincidence. Just as Eve was a complement and helper to Adam so the holy spirit is God's helper, and a complement to him. It is his wife. It is Jesus' mum. The 3, God, The Holy Spirit and Jesus, are a family. They are Father Mother and Son, for Jesus did not come from a single parent family as all churches would have you believe.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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